No dating policy

But consider this: according to a recent Workplace Options survey, nearly 85% of 18-29 year olds would have a romantic relationship with a co-worker, compared to just over 35% for 30-46 year olds and about 30% of 47-66 year olds.

Even more shocking is that 40% of those 18-29 year olds would date their supervisors.

It's not good for the company, the manager, the employee, or the employee's coworkers. And this holds for employees who date managers in another department.

The relationship, or frequently former relationship, limits how you as a manager can promote, or utilize the talents of, a subordinate.

This can be especially true in high-growth companies that demand long work hours and tend to hire more single employees.

The legal issue is what I like to call the "amplification" of potential liability that always exists around the employer-employee relationship.

There will foreseeably be claims of favoritism, or even discrimination or harassment.

When your routine is work-sleep-work, going out to date does not seem like a real option for many.

According to the Career Builder survey, some industries are more prone to inter-office dating than others.

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