Mental patients dating

This is a question myself and my graduate student, Marie-Eve Boucher, set out to answer during a recently completed research study published in the .

In this study, we interviewed a range of people with mental illnesses, such as major depression, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder, to learn more about their dating and romantic experience. Only 15 percent of participants were currently involved in a romantic relationship.

Indeed, we frequently heard statements such as ‘it would be good to have a girlfriend’ or ‘I am tired of being alone’ during the research.

But participants noted numerous barriers to a successful dating or romantic life.

That just exasperates symptoms associated with mental illness.The rest almost unanimously stated that they strongly desired a satisfying and rewarding romantic relationship.Many craved the affection and attention which comes with successful romance and often opined that this was a glaring hole in their lives.Implications Much research indicates that recovery is fostered when people with mental illness obtain and engage in normative social roles, such as gainful employment.Being ‘coupled-up’ is one of the most normative and desirable social roles in western societies.

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